img_Inside-Grand-Rapids-biggest-new-apartment-construction-projects

Inside Grand Rapids’ biggest new apartment construction projects

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – There’s still a lot of concrete to be poured and drywall to be painted, but progress is being made on two of the city’s largest apartment construction projects.

Rockford Construction Co. and Wolverine Building Group handed out hardhats and safety vests to reporters on Wednesday, Aug. 23, so they could show off the progress they are making on projects along Market Avenue SW and in the Midtown Neighborhood along the Medical Mile..

At 234 Market Avenue SW, Rockford Construction is past the halfway point in building an apartment complex that will include 235 rental units, a 300-car parking ramp and ground floor retail space

The property sits just west of a $60 million expansion of Founders Brewing Co. and across Market Avenue from 19 acres of riverfront property used by city public works departments. The city-owned land is on the market as a prime site for future development.

Project manager Dan Korcek said they are on schedule to complete the $44 million project by July 2018. Construction on the site of a former Showgirls Galleria night club began last October. The project has between 85 to 135 construction workers on the site every day, Korcek said.

The four-story apartment project will include units ranging from "micro-units" with less than 300 square feet to two-bedroom, two-bathroom corner units that will include exterior balconies with glass rails. The development also will include four-multi-story live/work units.

Pre-leasing by the owner, East Lansing-based Maplegrove Property Management has not yet begun.

At the Brix at Midtown project, Wolverine Building Group showed off 73 apartments they opened earlier this month. When completed by the end of January, the development will have 287 residential units and a 330-space parking garage.

Sprawling across the backside of the Michigan Street Hill, the four-story apartment building will be the largest wood-framed building in Grand Rapids, according to Project Manager Troy Hedman.

Offering one-bedroom to three-bedroom apartments, The Brix at Midtown will include three courtyards, a dog park, clubhouse, swimming pool and fitness center.

The Brix at Midtown name pays homage to the early history of neighborhood and "Brickyatt," the Dutch term for brickyard, according to Brookins. Dutch and Polish immigrants made bricks from clay in the neighborhood that were used for building materials.

The project is located east of Mid Towne Village, which includes a medical office building, Park Place condominiums and a Hampton Inn and Suites Hotel

The $53 million project is owned by Rise Real Estate, a Valdosta, Georgia-based developer that purchased 20 homes and businesses north of Michigan Street between Grand and Benson avenues.

The two projects are among several large apartment projects that are under construction in West Michigan this summer.

In Grandville, construction workers are working towards a fall completion of the Grand Castle Apartments, a 15-story project fashioned after the Neuschwanstein Castle in southern Germany.

The Grand Castle is aimed at middle-income and young professional, with monthly rents starting at $800 for a studio apartment to $1,740 for three-bedroom units. The penthouse units will rent for up to $4,500 for a 6,315-square-foot unit.

With more than 500 rental units in a turreted complex that will rise up to 15 floors, the $40 million Grand Castle promises to change the face of Grandville and the area’s rental market.

Along Monroe Avenue NW north of downtown, Orion Construction is working on Rivers Edge, a 34-unit apartment complex at 1001 Monroe Avenue NW.

Across the river, The Woda Group, an Ohio-based developer of affordable housing projects is building a 68-unit project called "Grand View Place."

In Grand Rapids Township, construction workers are building The Springs at Knapp’s Crossing, a 248-unit apartment community located along the East Beltline Avenue NE north of the Village at Knapp’s Crossing.

Along Knapp Street west of East Beltline Avenue NE, an Indianapolis apartment developer is building Knapp Corner Flats, a 203-unit complex aimed at millennials.

DeWys Manufacturing CEO Jon DeWys told Stabenow that it is important to start exposing young people to experiences in manufacturing and skilled trades early to bring relevancy.

Source Article

Warren Apartments for Rent

Warren Apartments for Rent

Finding Apartments for Rent in Warren, MI

With a population of more than 130,000 people at the time of the 2010 census, Warren is the third-largest city in Michigan and the largest suburb of Detroit, which is located directly to the south. Although Warren is bordered by Detroit, it couldn’t be more different. In most ways, it conforms with what you’d expect to find in any suburban city. It’s split up into four main districts, but each one is relatively similar to the other. Several major roads cross through Warren, and many are dotted with various commercial businesses. In between, there are numerous subdivisions and areas that include clusters of apartment communities. You’re in luck if you’re looking for an apartment in Warren, though. There are all kinds of options, so you should be able to find something that’s perfect for your needs and your budget without too much trouble.

Top Neighborhoods in Warren, MI

Although Warren is split into four major neighborhoods, very few of the people who live there ever refer to them by name. The neighborhoods have generic names like Southwest Warren, Northeast Warren and Southeast Warren, which is where you’ll find numerous post-WWII bungalows and smatterings of homes that were built during the 1960s and later. This part of the city is also dotted with several industrial parks. Warren Con, which is otherwise known as Northwest Warren, tends to have the most upscale neighborhoods and apartment communities, but it’s generally possible to find apartments of all kinds throughout the city.

Shopping in Warren, MI

As you’d expect to find in any large, suburban city, Warren is home to a dizzying array of shops, stores, boutiques and malls. Strip malls line many major arteries, including Van Dyke Avenue, Groesbeck Highway and 8 Mile Road. There’s no downtown per se, but many shops and stores are clustered along Dequindre Road, which forms the western boundary of the city. When you want to do some serious shopping, the best option is to head over to Lakeside Mall in neighboring Sterling Heights. It’s practically on the border of Warren and Sterling Heights and is anchored by two Macy’s, a JCPenney, a Sears and a Lord & Taylor. In addition to that, the mall houses more than 150 stores and restaurants.

Cultural Attractions in Warren, MI

Many people in metro Detroit aren’t aware of it, but Warren boasts a number of interesting cultural attractions. The Warren Symphony Orchestra is a prime example. Every year, the WSO puts on several performances, and they tend to perform to huge crowds. History buffs will appreciate the many historical sites that are found in Warren, including the Detroit Arsenal Tank Plank, which produced more than half of the Sherman tanks that were ultimately used during World War II. Many exhibits and performances are held throughout the year at the Macomb Center for the Performing Arts, which is part of Macomb Community College.

Sports in Warren, MI

For major league sports, Detroit is just a quick drive south from Warren. You can enjoy major league baseball, football and hockey there. The city of Warren is a great place for people who enjoy playing sports themselves. The Warren Community Center, which was completely renovated in the early 2000s, boasts a state-of-the-art indoor waterpark, a huge fitness center and many other key sports-related amenities. The city is also home to a network of nearly 25 parks, and most apartment communities in Warren are within walking distance of at least one of them. Many of the parks have well-maintained hiking and bicycling trails too, so there are plenty of options for those who enjoy running, hiking, walking, bicycling and other active pursuits.

Dining in Warren, MI

Warren boasts an incredible hodgepodge of dining options, and virtually every cuisine imaginable is represented. If you prefer major chain restaurants, you can take your pick from all of the usual suspects. Fast food eateries are plentiful too, and they’re scattered all across the city. The real excitement in dining out in Warren is being able to choose from a huge assortment of delectable cuisines. Metro Detroit is home to large populations of Arab Americans, so Middle Eastern restaurants are fairly ubiquitous. You never have to go far to find great shwarmas. Other popular cuisines include Chinese, Indian, Thai and Japanese.

Transportation Options in Warren, MI

You won’t find a subway or even a light rail system in Warren. In fact, the only real form of public transportation is provided by the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation, or SMART, which offers bus service throughout metro Detroit. The SMART bus system isn’t the most extensive one you’ll ever find, however, so the majority of those who live in Warren get around mostly by car. Warren isn’t exactly a pedestrian friendly place, but many apartment communities are within easy walking distance of key amenities and services.

Weather in Warren, MI

During the winter in Warren, you can expect to see plenty of snow. Then again, some winters pass by without hardly any accumulation at all. When snow does fall, however, the city is very good about plowing major roads immediately, so getting around doesn’t tend to be an issue. Summers in southeastern Michigan tend to be fairly hot and very humid, so finding an apartment with good air conditioning is a must. Most would agree that spring and fall are the best seasons, with beautiful flowers blooming in the spring and colorful leaves livening up the trees in the fall.

Rent Trends

As of August 2017, the average apartment rent in Warren, MI is $537 for a studio, $679 for one bedroom, $818 for two bedrooms, and $810 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Warren has increased by 2.1% in the past year.

Finding Apartments for Rent in Warren, MI

With a population of more than 130,000 people at the time of the 2010 census, Warren is the third-largest city in Michigan and the largest suburb of Detroit, which is located directly to the south. Although Warren is bordered by Detroit, it couldn’t be more different. In most ways, it conforms with what you’d expect to find in any suburban city. It’s split up into four main districts, but each one is relatively similar to the other. Several major roads cross through Warren, and many are dotted with various commercial businesses. In between, there are numerous subdivisions and areas that include clusters of apartment communities. You’re in luck if you’re looking for an apartment in Warren, though. There are all kinds of options, so you should be able to find something that’s perfect for your needs and your budget without too much trouble.

Top Neighborhoods in Warren, MI

Although Warren is split into four major neighborhoods, very few of the people who live there ever refer to them by name. The neighborhoods have generic names like Southwest Warren, Northeast Warren and Southeast Warren, which is where you’ll find numerous post-WWII bungalows and smatterings of homes that were built during the 1960s and later. This part of the city is also dotted with several industrial parks. Warren Con, which is otherwise known as Northwest Warren, tends to have the most upscale neighborhoods and apartment communities, but it’s generally possible to find apartments of all kinds throughout the city.

Shopping in Warren, MI

As you’d expect to find in any large, suburban city, Warren is home to a dizzying array of shops, stores, boutiques and malls. Strip malls line many major arteries, including Van Dyke Avenue, Groesbeck Highway and 8 Mile Road. There’s no downtown per se, but many shops and stores are clustered along Dequindre Road, which forms the western boundary of the city. When you want to do some serious shopping, the best option is to head over to Lakeside Mall in neighboring Sterling Heights. It’s practically on the border of Warren and Sterling Heights and is anchored by two Macy’s, a JCPenney, a Sears and a Lord & Taylor. In addition to that, the mall houses more than 150 stores and restaurants.

Cultural Attractions in Warren, MI

Many people in metro Detroit aren’t aware of it, but Warren boasts a number of interesting cultural attractions. The Warren Symphony Orchestra is a prime example. Every year, the WSO puts on several performances, and they tend to perform to huge crowds. History buffs will appreciate the many historical sites that are found in Warren, including the Detroit Arsenal Tank Plank, which produced more than half of the Sherman tanks that were ultimately used during World War II. Many exhibits and performances are held throughout the year at the Macomb Center for the Performing Arts, which is part of Macomb Community College.

Sports in Warren, MI

For major league sports, Detroit is just a quick drive south from Warren. You can enjoy major league baseball, football and hockey there. The city of Warren is a great place for people who enjoy playing sports themselves. The Warren Community Center, which was completely renovated in the early 2000s, boasts a state-of-the-art indoor waterpark, a huge fitness center and many other key sports-related amenities. The city is also home to a network of nearly 25 parks, and most apartment communities in Warren are within walking distance of at least one of them. Many of the parks have well-maintained hiking and bicycling trails too, so there are plenty of options for those who enjoy running, hiking, walking, bicycling and other active pursuits.

Dining in Warren, MI

Warren boasts an incredible hodgepodge of dining options, and virtually every cuisine imaginable is represented. If you prefer major chain restaurants, you can take your pick from all of the usual suspects. Fast food eateries are plentiful too, and they’re scattered all across the city. The real excitement in dining out in Warren is being able to choose from a huge assortment of delectable cuisines. Metro Detroit is home to large populations of Arab Americans, so Middle Eastern restaurants are fairly ubiquitous. You never have to go far to find great shwarmas. Other popular cuisines include Chinese, Indian, Thai and Japanese.

Transportation Options in Warren, MI

You won’t find a subway or even a light rail system in Warren. In fact, the only real form of public transportation is provided by the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation, or SMART, which offers bus service throughout metro Detroit. The SMART bus system isn’t the most extensive one you’ll ever find, however, so the majority of those who live in Warren get around mostly by car. Warren isn’t exactly a pedestrian friendly place, but many apartment communities are within easy walking distance of key amenities and services.

Weather in Warren, MI

During the winter in Warren, you can expect to see plenty of snow. Then again, some winters pass by without hardly any accumulation at all. When snow does fall, however, the city is very good about plowing major roads immediately, so getting around doesn’t tend to be an issue. Summers in southeastern Michigan tend to be fairly hot and very humid, so finding an apartment with good air conditioning is a must. Most would agree that spring and fall are the best seasons, with beautiful flowers blooming in the spring and colorful leaves livening up the trees in the fall.

Rent Trends

As of August 2017, the average apartment rent in Warren, MI is $537 for a studio, $679 for one bedroom, $818 for two bedrooms, and $810 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Warren has increased by 2.1% in the past year.

Finding Apartments for Rent in Warren, MI

With a population of more than 130,000 people at the time of the 2010 census, Warren is the third-largest city in Michigan and the largest suburb of Detroit, which is located directly to the south. Although Warren is bordered by Detroit, it couldn’t be more different. In most ways, it conforms with what you’d expect to find in any suburban city. It’s split up into four main districts, but each one is relatively similar to the other. Several major roads cross through Warren, and many are dotted with various commercial businesses. In between, there are numerous subdivisions and areas that include clusters of apartment communities. You’re in luck if you’re looking for an apartment in Warren, though. There are all kinds of options, so you should be able to find something that’s perfect for your needs and your budget without too much trouble.

Top Neighborhoods in Warren, MI

Although Warren is split into four major neighborhoods, very few of the people who live there ever refer to them by name. The neighborhoods have generic names like Southwest Warren, Northeast Warren and Southeast Warren, which is where you’ll find numerous post-WWII bungalows and smatterings of homes that were built during the 1960s and later. This part of the city is also dotted with several industrial parks. Warren Con, which is otherwise known as Northwest Warren, tends to have the most upscale neighborhoods and apartment communities, but it’s generally possible to find apartments of all kinds throughout the city.

Shopping in Warren, MI

As you’d expect to find in any large, suburban city, Warren is home to a dizzying array of shops, stores, boutiques and malls. Strip malls line many major arteries, including Van Dyke Avenue, Groesbeck Highway and 8 Mile Road. There’s no downtown per se, but many shops and stores are clustered along Dequindre Road, which forms the western boundary of the city. When you want to do some serious shopping, the best option is to head over to Lakeside Mall in neighboring Sterling Heights. It’s practically on the border of Warren and Sterling Heights and is anchored by two Macy’s, a JCPenney, a Sears and a Lord & Taylor. In addition to that, the mall houses more than 150 stores and restaurants.

Cultural Attractions in Warren, MI

Many people in metro Detroit aren’t aware of it, but Warren boasts a number of interesting cultural attractions. The Warren Symphony Orchestra is a prime example. Every year, the WSO puts on several performances, and they tend to perform to huge crowds. History buffs will appreciate the many historical sites that are found in Warren, including the Detroit Arsenal Tank Plank, which produced more than half of the Sherman tanks that were ultimately used during World War II. Many exhibits and performances are held throughout the year at the Macomb Center for the Performing Arts, which is part of Macomb Community College.

Sports in Warren, MI

For major league sports, Detroit is just a quick drive south from Warren. You can enjoy major league baseball, football and hockey there. The city of Warren is a great place for people who enjoy playing sports themselves. The Warren Community Center, which was completely renovated in the early 2000s, boasts a state-of-the-art indoor waterpark, a huge fitness center and many other key sports-related amenities. The city is also home to a network of nearly 25 parks, and most apartment communities in Warren are within walking distance of at least one of them. Many of the parks have well-maintained hiking and bicycling trails too, so there are plenty of options for those who enjoy running, hiking, walking, bicycling and other active pursuits.

Dining in Warren, MI

Warren boasts an incredible hodgepodge of dining options, and virtually every cuisine imaginable is represented. If you prefer major chain restaurants, you can take your pick from all of the usual suspects. Fast food eateries are plentiful too, and they’re scattered all across the city. The real excitement in dining out in Warren is being able to choose from a huge assortment of delectable cuisines. Metro Detroit is home to large populations of Arab Americans, so Middle Eastern restaurants are fairly ubiquitous. You never have to go far to find great shwarmas. Other popular cuisines include Chinese, Indian, Thai and Japanese.

Transportation Options in Warren, MI

You won’t find a subway or even a light rail system in Warren. In fact, the only real form of public transportation is provided by the Suburban Mobility Authority for Regional Transportation, or SMART, which offers bus service throughout metro Detroit. The SMART bus system isn’t the most extensive one you’ll ever find, however, so the majority of those who live in Warren get around mostly by car. Warren isn’t exactly a pedestrian friendly place, but many apartment communities are within easy walking distance of key amenities and services.

Weather in Warren, MI

During the winter in Warren, you can expect to see plenty of snow. Then again, some winters pass by without hardly any accumulation at all. When snow does fall, however, the city is very good about plowing major roads immediately, so getting around doesn’t tend to be an issue. Summers in southeastern Michigan tend to be fairly hot and very humid, so finding an apartment with good air conditioning is a must. Most would agree that spring and fall are the best seasons, with beautiful flowers blooming in the spring and colorful leaves livening up the trees in the fall.

Rent Trends

As of August 2017, the average apartment rent in Warren, MI is $537 for a studio, $679 for one bedroom, $818 for two bedrooms, and $810 for three bedrooms. Apartment rent in Warren has increased by 2.1% in the past year.

Source Article

img_Holland-MichiganEverything-That-You-Need-to-Know

Holland Michigan:Everything That You Need to Know

Holland Michigan has so much to offer to so many different demographic of people. It is one of those places that many people do not know about but when people learn about they were to immediately move. They want to immediately move here because this place has so much to offer. It is a great place for families to move to because the schools are really good, there are plenty of family things to do, there things to do outside in different companies and small businesses and restaurants that all cater to families.

Holland Michigan, is not just good for families but it is good for single people to. There’s a ton of things for single people to do here, there plenty places to work nearby and in neighboring cities, is a strong single scene in many of the things that families love to do, single people will love to do as well. So definitely has a little bit of everything for the right people is one of those places where many different groups of people would love to call it there home and they all get something from it. It is to simply and enjoyable place to live.

So know that Holland Michigan is a great place to visit, to live, is great for families and single people alike. There many different things to do, explain you do outside, many different restaurants, shops and sporting events that people can attend and interact in. So learn as much as you can about this area and you will see to it is the right place for you. There’s so much to do, so much culture, it is safe in the quality of life is very high. People who move here tend to stay here for a very long time.

img_Water-levels-rising-in-Great-Lakes-effects-felt-at-Holland-area-beaches

Water levels rising in Great Lakes, effects felt at Holland-area beaches

By Jake.Allen / @hollandsentinel.com / 616-546-4273

The monthly water level average for July 2017 in Lake Michigan was the highest recorded since October 1997.

Deb Thompson’s eight mile runs on the Laketown Beach are getting tougher.

This is because the water level of Lake Michigan is rising and is leaving less beach to run on, Thompson said.

Thompson, a resident of Holland for the past three years, is right. Lake Michigan beaches are shrinking and water levels in the Great Lakes are on the rise.

The monthly water level average for July 2017 in Lake Michigan was the highest recorded since October 1997, according to data from the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory.

The laboratory measures Lake Michigan and Lake Huron as one unit.

Lake Michigan water levels hit a record low of 576.02 feet in January 2013, but have been above average since July 2014.

“For me I always run right along the water line anyway and today it’s fairly calm,” Thompson said. “But days where the water is really rough, it’s hard because you are running against these crashing waves and you don’t have much beach to run on.”

Thompson isn’t the only one feeling the effects of the rising waters of Lake Michigan in the Holland area.

##jsScript_1##

Holland State Park Supervisor Sean Mulligan said the crews from the state had to re-locate a deck used to help people with disabilities access the water.

The sand underneath the deck was being washed away due to high water levels. Life ring stations also had to be moved further inland due to rising water.

“The water is coming up higher and it’s actually eroded away the beach further up than usual,” Mulligan said. “We’ve got little drop offs now instead of smooth transition from the beach into the water.”

Sidewalk flooding is an issue when the water gets rough because it is coming over the walls of the channel between Lake Michigan and Macatawa Bay at the state park due to high water.

Because of the state park’s extensive beach, Mulligan said the impacts haven’t really been felt by visitors. Maintenance issues due to rising waters are the biggest problem, he said.

Bob Reichel, a parks operations manager for Ottawa County Parks, has been taking care of the county’s lakeshore parks since the last time water levels were well above average in 1997.

Some Ottawa County beaches aren’t as large as the one at Holland State Park and Reichel said most of the beaches he manages have lost somewhere between 100 feet to 150 feet of dry sand due to rising water levels.

“We’ve lost that much sand area and our beach area is very limited now, especially compared to what it has been in past years when we had lower lake levels,” Reichel said.

Another impact of the rising water levels is the washing up of eroded dune grass on beaches in Ottawa County.

Reichel said high waters have also washed up other debris, such as pieces of deck and large tree trunks, onto Ottawa County beaches.

The beaches, which have lost the most dry sand are Kirk Park in West Olive and Rosy Mound Natural Area in Grand Haven, Reichel said.

Al Meshkin, Laketown Township manager, agreed with Thompson that Laketown Beach is another area hit hard by rising water.

“My understanding is there’s not much beach left,” Meshkin said. “The water level is pretty high and the water levels fluctuate all the time. Right now we are going through a very high water level time.”

Drew Gronewold, a hydrologist with the Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, said high water levels in the late summer months are part of a seasonal process.

Water levels in the Great Lakes normally rise in the spring as snow melts, peak in August or July and then decrease in November and October as water evaporates from the lakes at a high rate. Water levels usually hit a low for the year in the winter months.

If that process continued with average snowfall, average runoff in the spring and average evaporation in the fall then water levels would stay around the same level, Gronwold said.

Since early 2013 precipitation in the Great Lakes region has been above average and evaporation has been below average. Gronewold said this is the cause behind the increase in water levels since 2013.

“Really the story is since then, over the past couple years it has been very wet and the precipitation has been above average and water levels have been high as well,” Gronewold said.

This process has caused the increase of water levels not only in Lake Michigan and Lake Huron, but all the Great Lakes. Lake Ontario’s June 2017 monthly water level average was higher than any monthly average recorded for the lake since 1918. Lake Erie’s monthly water level average for June 2017 was the highest recorded since April 1998. Lake Superior’s July 2017 monthly water level average was the highest recorded since September 1996.

“There is part of a larger story here that all the lakes are all very high right now and not just because it’s summer time,” Gronewold said. “They are high for even this time of year relative to the long term average.”

Gronewold said the rise of water levels in the Great Lakes can be associated with a natural, cyclical process as well as human impact. One example of human impact on water levels is the dredging of channels between lakes to make sure large ships can pass through. Although the impacts of dredging are minor, Gronewold said dredging allows more water to flow through channels thus changing the water levels of the lakes.

Diversion of water in and out of the Great Lakes also has an impact on water levels. Gronewold said water is diverted out of Lake Michigan near Chicago. The outflow of water in Lake Ontario and Lake Superior are also controlled and regulated. The impacts of dredging, diversion of water and controlling the outflow of some of the Great Lakes are relatively small compared to “real drivers” of water level changes, Gronwold said.

The natural hydrologic cycle, climate change and climate variability are what really impact water levels in the Great Lakes on a large scale, Gronewold said.

As water levels in the Great Lakes are at the highest levels in about a decade, questions still remain about how much impact humans are having.

“There’s still the question of how much of the changes we are seeing are due to human induced climate change and that’s something we still are doing research on,” Gronewold said.

— Follow this reporter on Twitter @SentinelJake.

Source Article